, attached to 1988-03-11

Review by stgsince88

stgsince88 I have to preface this by saying this is less of a show review than a tale of my experience. More than twelve years have passed and not once have I owned a tape of this show. As a freshman at Johnson State I spent most of the year partying in my dorm. This is because at the very first party I went to, they carded people to weed out us freshman losers. So after that I just never left campus. This was fine and dandy as political correctness hadn't yet taken over alcohol policies on campus, and the sky was the limit. My point is that not having anything else to do in a small town in Vermont forced me to head down to the Base Lodge for each and every show that happened. It was my money going into these shows and I wanted my money's worth from college! Most of what I saw was a disappointment. I came from the classic rock school of thought. My favorite bands at the time were Yes and Genesis, and no one could touch them as far as I was concerned. This was mainly because they were so different from everything else out there. But I kept an open mind. The ‘80s were bereft of quality music and I had had about enough of it, but that quickly changed one night at the Slodge. (We called it that as a term of endearment. Also the Moose Lodge, Space Garage…the names go on and on.) Anyway, there was a bit more of a stink made about this one show than the typical night at the Base Lodge. But that wasn't saying much; all it warranted was a slightly larger party than normal. Phish still wasn't that well known , even in Stearns, only thirty-five miles from Burlington. There were a few folks who made trips to Burlington to see them, but those travelers were few and far between. As for myself, it took this visit to my usual hangout to facilitate my first Phish show. After some typical college pre-show preparations, I went down to the Lodge, which was part of the student center. Strange that they didn't bring in enough of a crowd to play at Dibden (the auditorium) which isn't that big, but much bigger than the Lodge. The room couldn't hold much more than maybe a couple hundred, and on this night there was less than that. I kind of recall it feeling roomy. It didn't even take rubbing elbows to get to where I stood up front. I noticed that there were a few hippie-looking outsiders who had made the trip for the show. This in itself was pretty new to me. JSC had a large Dead following, but I hadn't been part of that so this Philly boy was in a new world. Once I got in place, I spent most of the night standing literally three inches away from Page's Hammond organ; in fact, I may even have been leaning on it. I watched the Leslie speaker spin round and round the whole time, and thought that was the coolest thing I had ever seen! I thought, "Man, what a cool band to have this neat thing." I was just smiling away and I caught Page laughing at my obvious amazement with the Leslie. They opened with “The Chicken”, followed by “Funky Bitch”, both songs I had never heard before. The performance didn't impress too much upon me, but it was rocking, garage band-type entertainment so I wasn't ready to leave just yet. Next came “Sneakin’ Sally”. I was a huge fan of this song at the time and they didn't disappoint me by playing it. That sealed the fact that I wouldn't be wandering back to my dorm room anytime soon. Following this they played “Take the A Train”. I didn't know jazz from a hole in the ground, but I did understand enough to know that this was not your ordinary band. It was the next tune that changed my life forever. When I first heard “YEM”, I knew that it was the end of an era. The lack of originality that marked the ‘80s had come to a screeching halt. This was the first Phish original I ever heard, and I was dumbfounded! This is the Phish sound. It's what differentiates them from other bands. It was incredibly refreshing to hear something so different. Yes, in progressive rock I had heard things like it, but this was different. And (for me) new. The way it kept intricately building into near noise until it exploded into a tight groove wasn't necessarily new to music, but the way this band did it was new to me. And such a distinct overall sound. Somehow it came from a band that came from the ‘80s. I sincerely thought I would forever be stuck in the world of classic rock from the ‘60s and ‘70s; yet here was a song that obviously was influenced by that music, but so different at the same time. They had opened up with covers and I thought they were just going to be a cover band with a few originals thrown in for good measure. But song after song of composition and improvisation with sick jamming continually bombarded me. I'll be honest that the only other thing I really recall after twelve years is “Lizards”. For some reason this song truly struck a chord in me. I left that night singing, "But I'm never ever going back there / and I couldn't if I tried / cause I come from the land of the Lizards / and the Lizards they have died / the Lizards they have died / the Lizards they have died!" After this, I wanted nothing but Phish in my ears. I knew there was finally hope in the world…musically, anyway. I saw them again in two months; if not for lack of a car, the return would have been even sooner. In retrospect, this unsuspecting night at the Lodge changed my life.
, attached to 1991-11-07

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ This is a pretty sweet Fall '91 show that features some really strong playing from all members of the band. Though only Set 2 was released on LivePhish, it's certainly worth checking out the first half of the show on Relisten (or wherever you get your tape goodies). Among some very solid performances--including a few of the new tunes!--this YEM is an absolute heater. Trey's solo section in particular ascends to crazy heights from a laidback but stanky start. Fishman helps facilitate some real gnarly jamming, playing with subdivisions and driving the energy forward with monstrous momentum. It's Ice and Runaway Jim also feature some great soloing from Page and Trey, respectively. In Set 2, things really take off. Clocking in at only five and a half minutes, this Brother wastes no time navigating to shrill, dissonant, jam space. It's very impressive the energy they achieve in such a compact song. In a similar vein, the Reba jam accomplishes some crazy beautiful moments despite making up less than half the tune's runtime. Including splashes of harmonic clash and a great soaring finale, this is certainly a notable performance for this early period in the band's career (check out 7/14/1991 for another great '91 Reba). Tube also grants some tight leashed greatness, as Page absolutely wrecks the keys on this version--would've loved to hear it go for a bit longer. Then Aquarium Rescue Unit joins Phish on stage--always a sign of greatness to come. This David Bowie, featuring some wild bass slapping, unhinged scatting from Col. Bruce Hampton, and utterly frenetic guitar dueling between Jimmy Herring and Trey, is beyond face-melting. The band sets into a swanky groove more akin to a YEM than a Bowie fairly early on, sowing the seeds of chaos. A very Type II breakdown ensues, followed by the reaping of a faster Bowie outro that bursts through the stratosphere around 11:30. For the love of God, listen to this Bowie. The Love You jam is pretty unique, and a breath of fresh air compared to the other performances as this one contains a bit more musical improvisation than novel goofiness. Finally, a tease/signal heavy Possum wraps up Set 2 with great ferocity (continued in the Fire encore). Something about that bayou water...the boys were absolutely shredding this show.
, attached to 1989-05-13

Review by thelot

thelot The sound quality for this show leaves a lot to be desired. There’s noticeable static that is present throughout the recording. I felt the performance was pretty straightforward for what they’ve done thus far. Set 1 felt longer than average. Unfortunately, Bowie cuts out as the jam starts. This is the first time I can recall that they extend the intro out a bit adding some teases from songs in the set. While set 1 was long I felt it never really gained any traction. I thought set 2 was better overall with beautiful versions of Hood and Whipping Post. Highlights: Possum, Hood and Whipping Post
, attached to 1989-05-13

Review by thelot

thelot The sound quality for this show leaves a lot to be desired. There’s noticeable static that is present throughout the recording. It I felt the performance was pretty straightforward for what they’ve done thus far. Set 1 felt longer than average. Unfortunately, Bowie cuts out as the jam starts. This is the first time I can recall that they extend the intro out a bit adding some teases from songs in the set. While set 1 was long I felt it never really gained any traction. I thought set 2 was better overall with beautiful versions of Hood and Whipping Post. Highlights: Possum, Hood and Whipping Post
, attached to 2021-08-01

Review by SkyTrainWand

SkyTrainWand I'll put in here for a show review what I entered for the phish.net JOTY contest about the Tweezer from THIS show: ... When they change into a major key for the first time I imagine slowly falling into a giant pillow. I was also present in the venue for this Tweezer. I finally got to where I needed to be for the jam and I remember feeling several times like *everyone* in my area was moving in this widespread chaotic synchronicity, like there were thousands of invisible rubber bands connecting everyone under the roof and probably on the lawn too. I'm sure some of you have noticed the "elastic" effect before, I think it happens every so often when the band and crowd manage to connect on a *deeper* level than usual. This Tweezer was exactly that - elastic. Phish metaphysics! The very first big peak in this one is SO GOOD and I swear there wasn't a single soul that wasn't dancing their ass off. There's a solid 12-13 minutes of jamming after that and all of it is awesome and that is why Tweezer wins. I am surprised that so many phans were still wearing pants after that incredible jam!
, attached to 1992-05-16

Review by bblock

bblock It's almost impossible to believe that it's been 30 years since my first Phish show at The Orpheum in Boston. They say you always remember your first - and I sure do. I've been privileged to see some 25+ shows over the years in 7 states including some standout performances including: * NYE 1992 at Matthew's Arena w/Dude of Life * NYE 1994 with the flying hot dog * The Real Gin at Worcester * 3 amazing nights in Hampton in 2013 * Tweezer Fest at MPP 2014 But, I hold a special place in my heart for 5/16/92 -- my first show! I was introduced to the band while in college at UPenn, when a friend of mine saw them at a tiny Philadelphia venue in February and brought back A Picture of Nectar CD. For the rest of the semester, I must have listened to that outstanding album about 5 dozen times. No music I had ever heard before sounded like this amazing band! My Deadhead roommate painstakingly figured out most of Stash on his guitar. For the next several months, I found rec.music.phish and started trading tapes with kind souls around the country to find as much live Phish as I could. Little did I know what was in store when returning home to Boston for the Summer. A few days after coming back to my suburban Boston home, I was at a buddy Dave's house and preaching to him the gospel of Phish. Casually, Dave said he was going to see them on Saturday! [b]What?! GTFO![/b] Immediately I ordered two tickets and invited my friend Mike to the show. Saturday night we arrived outside The Orpheum and enjoyed people watching the crowd outside the venue. Someone offered us to trade our decent tickets and a few bucks for tickets in the 3rd row front and center. What a great decision. The Orpheum held less than 3,000 people, yet being up front for my first Phish experience will never be forgotten. The energy in the room was electric and at some points, it felt like the entire balcony was going to fall down on top of everyone with the frenzied dancing and partying. The music was great and I know that I had a blissful ear to ear smile on my face all night long. Of course, back in 1992, Phish's repertoire wasn't close to the depth and breadth that it is now. However, the playlist reads like absolute classic Phish and many of these songs are still chased by fans to this day. While standard fare today, watching the boys in 1992 smoothly segue from one song to another was a sight to see and a sound to behold. The jokes, teases, trampolines, and a cappella were all new and fresh. I loved this band. We had a blast at this show and then 3 more in 1992, including at a tiny baseball field called Holman Stadium in Nashua, NH where we enjoyed a set by Phish and an entire show by Santana and some jamming together. Morning after my first show on 5/16/92, my parents asked about the show and the band, and I told them that they were "4 extremely talented musicians who are clearly having a fantastic time on stage making & creating. not just playing, music" Certainly that answer still holds up 30 years later.
, attached to 1991-07-19

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ I admittedly haven't listened to a ton of summer '91--just the official LivePhish releases and whatever gems Shapiro has included in Live Bait releases. As far as full shows goes, I think the criticism of setlist repetition is certainly fair and dissuades me from diving much deeper into the rest of the tour. With that said, I do really love the GCH arrangements of these regular rotation songs. Having the horns present really takes a few of these songs to a new place that can make one forget they're even listening to Phish (Landlady, Gumbo, Magilla, and Lawn Boy especially glow up with the horn solos). Outside of the more straightforward tunes on this show, there are a few notable highlights. For me, the most obvious is YEM. Frankly I'm surprised this isn't in the jam charts; while the tune doesn't ever really stray from the typical groove, all members of the band and horn ensemble bring their A-game. Plenty of excellent dynamic variance, fun Frankenstein and Chameleon elements, and a VJ that leans on the trumpet and percussion for a uniquely afrobeat energy all mark this performance as exceptional in my book. Tweezer comes with some nice dissonance and a steadily ascending energy driven in part by Fishman's vocal ramblings. The presence of the horns on this one definitely helps contribute to the feeling of chaos brewing throughout the jam. Really excellent playing on David Bowie as well (as always :) ), and I LOVE the sax solo on the outro of Mango Song--wish that was a more common element of the song because it just feels so, so right.
, attached to 1988-05-15

Review by stgsince88

stgsince88 I was there. I was at Johnson State College at the time. My sister was at UVM. My finals were over so I went to burlington to hang out with my sister before we both went home for the summer. She said we were going to a friends farm to see a band called Phish. I said I know Phish they played t my school on 3/11 and I loved them so I was excited. WE drove to Hinesburg and it was simply a huge keg party on a farm. The stage was just next to a river/stream that was cold as ice. In it were many kegs. And playing was Phish. On the other side of the river were hiking trails and I thought it was great that they had signs for the trails that were like ski trails with the same ratings, blue square, diamond, double diamond etc. What blew me away though was this band I saw at my school 2 months earlier. For some reason it was lizards that really hit me, I fucking love this band!! And here I am 34 years later with the same love.
, attached to 2022-04-21

Review by Dinner_in_Alaska

Dinner_in_Alaska For me, sitting solo this night I was never alone. In a room filled with friends known and unknown, my friend and brother on N2 was the music and the music from start to finish was a beautiful dream. I want to highlight how wonderful the build up to our lift off was. First, having Suzy at her first show and the band opening with her song was just exactly what Phish is, fucking crazy! Suzy Greenberg’s first show? GTFO that’s fucking amazing! Loved it. A proper rocker 46 Days then led us into my very first and long sought after Plasma. This next thing I say may be weird, but TMWSIY was the launching point for me. I just felt that during the beauty and magic of the quiet notes ringing out over us (not a single talker in my section to boot), that we were collectively passing through a portal to a new place that is mapped out for a brief time in the music being played. My expectations soared after the Hebrew prayer was sung and with the closing notes of TMWSIY we launched into a Wolfman’s whose ragging peak of a close will speak for itself for years to come. Listening back in the pause after, a guy in the crowd is yelling , “Sing Monica!” but Trey wanted to tell the story of Esther and so they did. Having only recently caught my first live version (see The Gorge) I was just as excited to get it again at my next run of shows. Our story of Esther ended were the Story of the (good god almighty) Ghost begins! What a way to end the first set, my heart was already so full. I could go on and on about the 2nd set, but I’m not. It speaks for itself and many others have left their wonderful thoughts on it. I will only say this, the Your Pet Tweezer is My Pet Tweezer. That beautiful uplifting jam is my jam. It’s been the background music in my head nonstop since that night. As I sit here in my projects office alone in the Arctic writing this review, in place of writing about the rest of the 2nd set, I’m going to once again listen to it and follow the road map through the portal of space and time to that place, even if I can only glimpse it for a moment. I highly recommend you do the same. Cheers.
, attached to 1989-05-09

Review by thelot

thelot Sound quality is decent enough. It sounds like the pitch may be a hair sharp. Almost sounds like the source cassette may have sat on the car dash for a summer or two. The show itself is pretty strong. However, most of the action takes place during the second set. Set 1 was highlighted by a strong Weekapaug, Possum and Sky. Set 2 was fantastic but the guest “Hijack” during I Didn’t Know was like nails on a chalkboard. I actually kind of enjoyed the last time Eyeburn came out on 3/12/89 at Nectars, but this time was kind of annoying. I Didn’t Know I was that far gone…”yes you did!” lol One thing of note about I Didn’t Know that’s not listed is that they say Pardon me Daubs instead of Doug. Another incredible version of Harpua tonight! Somewhat of a sister version to the last one played at The Zoo on 4/20. Unfortunately, If I Don’t Be There by Morning is missing from the recording. YEM is a must hear, as is the Slave->Esther combo. Slave is unfinished and Esther is perfect if not for the botched ending. Antelope to follow is also a must hear. Even La Grange and Bold as Love slay! Check it out!
, attached to 1991-07-12

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Every once in a while it's fun to return to the summer '91 shows with the Giant Country Horns. Most of my Phish listening focuses on '93 and beyond, as I believe is the case for most Phans. By turning back the clock to earlier shows, we get some great tunes that fell out of regular rotation as well as some that stuck around as staples but sound distinguished this early in the band's development. Throw in the Giant Country Horns with some nice solos and excellent arrangements and you've got yourself a show that stands out from the usual listening. As a 3.0 Phan, I began my exploration of the catalog relatively late in the band's career. By chance, Spotify directed me to 7/12/91 for a couple versions of tunes that would help form the foundation for the rest of the journey, namely AC/DC Bag and Mike's Song. Though these two performances are obviously a little different from the songs' typical styles, I fell in love with each and to this day still miss the call and response between Trey's vocals and GCH on Bag's chorus. These two biggest hitters from this show feature some really excellent playing by Trey, who was really beginning to heat up his chops at this point. The rest of the show features some strong versions of other tunes (especially David Bowie and Gumbo), and plenty of interesting horn accompaniment that breathes fresh life into the usual repertoire. Aside from the aforementioned, I feel that the Landlady, Cavern, Golgi, and Suzy Greenberg really glow up with the addition of GCH. In addition, the jazz tunes Flat Fee, Donna Lee, and Moose the Mooche fit excellently into the set for some diversification (perhaps even better than some of the acoustic bluegrass tunes prevalent in '93). A couple final shoutouts for Tweezer, where I was really impressed with the incorporation of additional horn riffs on top of the already busy and intricate rhythms produced by the core 4, and Frankenstein, which did more truthful justice to Edgar Winter with the brass (even if Page's synth was absent). All around, this is a very fun show from a unique period for the band. It's fun to imagine what some other later Phish tunes may have sounded like had GCH remained a more integral part of the band's career, though I guess TAB sort of gives us a taste of that.
, attached to 1993-08-26

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ The penultimate show from a legendary tour, 8/26/93 serves as an excellent sample of summer '93. Both sets contain some ridiculously awesome jamming, though Set 1 is a bit more consistent and filled out (as is the case with a few other big shows from this month). This distinction is largely due to the amount of set real estate left for Baby Gramps' sit-in and the HYHU performance, a touch akin to many of the other August '93 shows that featured HYHU, Purple Rain, or acoustic/a cappella sessions that demonstrate novelty over prowess. While moments like these are certainly central to the band's character, and I would never wish them out of this transitional phase into a more matured group, the gag loses some of its initial luster after one listens through enough of the tour--especially when these moments consistently close otherwise fantastical shows and rinse away the taste of the more jaw-dropping jams. Regardless, this show has plenty to unpack and is a fantastic representation of the band at this stage in their career. Set 1 is fully loaded with noteworthy performances, including a playfully climbing Runaway Jim opener, another Reba that grips the heart in August '93 fashion, a Fee that includes a heavily Type II outro, a SOaM that demonstrates a maturing approach to improvisation involving the entire band with true direction (my god the end of this jam is so fucking sick), and a Harry Hood that really milks the ascent before reaching its glorified acme. The whole band stays on point through the whole set, but I'll give a special shoutout to Page, who shines exceptionally bright--especially on Esther and It's Ice. Set 2 starts off with that beloved 2001 opener before diving right into David Bowie. Summer '93 has produced many incredible Bowie jams, and this example is no exception. The jam here sticks a little more strictly to the recognizable Bowie elements than the uber-exploratory performance from 8/17/93, with only a few moments that break free of the usual groove and harmonic movement (though Trey works in plenty of nice improvisational riffs that build atop the foundation). That said, any dearth of adventure is easily made up for with an insane ferocity. The energy behind this jam is fucking high octane, and the band definitely deserves the easy breezy Lifeboy that follows. Surviving a somewhat rough Rift, the band dials back in for a KILLER JJLC. Once again, Page is operating on another level, delivering those ZZ Top vocals with grit and swagger before absolutely commanding the room during his piano solo. Trey follows suit, taking the band sky high and then crashing back down to earth. As stated before, the rest of the set's highlights come from the goofy HYHU>Nothin' But>HYHU, not quite as praiseworthy in my book. A strong CDT and Free Bird encore closes the show with an appropriate juxtaposition of pure musicianship against a goof that caters to the band's burgeoning in-group community.
, attached to 1993-08-17

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ August '93 has got to be one of the band's hottest and most consistent months. The musicianship, deep repertoire, and exploratory spirit represented in each show on the tour speaks to the phase of development Phish was in at the time. Most notable is the regular prevalence of Type II jamming, which results in dozens of notable and formative performances over the course of a few weeks. The improvisational approach is noticeably still maturing (as it would continue to do so through the next few years), and often comprises of a decomposing / fragmenting a jam, riding along with some harmonic dissonance and rhythmic interplay, and then capitalizing on some new idea that's birthed out of this less structured section without a very fluid transition. While this methodology no doubt produces some awesome music and leads to extremely creative jams, it can also sometimes feel a bit like the band is lost in these liminal segments, looking for some idea with more substance to inspire further jamming. 8/17/93 provides two examples of tunes that I think really demonstrate more thoroughly developed Type II jams: David Bowie and YEM. Sets 1 and 2 both contain some really awesome performances of other tunes: Wilson transitions into Llama with a cool improvisation that launches the show at high velocity from the get-go, Divided Sky and Maze showcase Machine Gun Trey's chops, Fluffhead and FEFY produce some very powerful solo sections, and Page goes balls-to-the-wall on Suzy. But the main focus of this show should be on Bowie and YEM. Hot off a 2001 set opener, David Bowie dives right into the composed section, forgoing a more unique intro like the one from Murat. However, once the jam begins, it's clear that something special is about to take place. Sections of this jam transition together with such natural fluidity that it's hard to draw distinct lines between them. Through rhythmic variations and key changes, Trey does a particularly phenomenal job changing seats between a soloing guitarist and a band leader that contributes more directly and explicitly to the groove of the moment. Along with Stash 8/15/93, this is one of my absolute favorite August '93 jams. YEM brings a similar improvisational prowess, breaking free of the traditional YEM groove during Trey's solo to develop on a few different cadences, including an utterly blazing jam inspired by Frankenstein. The following BnD jam is swanky and laid back, giving way to an extended VJ. Definitely check these two tunes out.
, attached to 1989-05-06

Review by thelot

thelot The sound quality is so so on this one. I’m sure the Master audience recording sounds amazing though as it still isn’t too bad. Unfortunately, there are multiple splices and cuts throughout. With that said, this show is pretty darn good!! Some notes: Esther still features the Gamehendge introduction which started at The Zoo on 4/20. Forbin>Mockingbird has narration between tracks for the first time. Sloth still features the composed ending. Possum follows once again with no segue. Show Highlights: YEM, Mike’s Groove, Esther, AC/DC, Bowie!!!, Hood, Slave!!!, Sky
, attached to 1993-08-15

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Sandwiched right between the highly regarded 8/13 Murat, 8/14 Tinsley Park, 8/16 St. Louis, and 8/17 Kansas City performances, 8/15/93 in Louisville marks as the halfway point in a crazy 5-night stretch of consecutive shows. As each of the other aforementioned shows have their own LivePhish release, this one might not get as much attention from the Phan base. While it might not be as consistently amazing as the surrounding evenings, it's definitely worth checking this one out on Relisten, if only for a few tunes (Stash is a required listening for Phans). Set 1 has some great moments among a uniquely Phishy arrangement of Caravan (jazzheads have to listen to this one), a Runaway Jim that climbs from delicacy to a mighty peak through a nice jam, and a Fee with a cheeky, dreamlike groove appended to the outro that gives Mike a bit of spotlight. The heavy hitter of the show is most certainly Stash, which I believe reaches Top 3 Ever status (among 11/14/95 and 7/2/97). To copy an earlier description I wrote: [i]In contrast to some of the more capricious jams from summer of '93, this one builds on itself and evolves with extreme patience that challenges one to delineate distinct sections. Around 11:00, the band aligns on a fantastically optimistic mixolydian groove full of rhythmic and melodic elements reminiscent of Mango Song. The less-organized blend back into Stash plays extremely well.[/i] After this, a fun Colonel Forbin-> Mockingbird and CDT take us home. Set 2 starts with a nice Rift, followed by a big summer of '93 Tweezer. This one covers a lot of Type II ground, working in some Tweezer-based riffing, Antelope-style higher tempo groove, and dissonant reggae influence, and ultimately working its way back to a blazing Tweezer and burning out to a slow stop. The rest of Set 2 is less notable, hitting a couple more standard electric tracks (including a Maze that lives up to its great August 93 peers), and then transitioning to an acoustic/a cappella set up that capitalizes on the intimacy of the venue. While I'm sure this would've been special to witness, it ends things on a lower note from a tape-listener's perspective. Thankfully, the band opts for a Harry Hood encore to inject one last bit of jam into the evening. The Hood jam scratches the itch for sure, dabbling in more patient and subdued ground (and even teasing a Dorian modal shift for a quick second) before arriving at the peak. *chef's kiss*
, attached to 1989-05-05

Review by thelot

thelot The source info has this listed as a Cass/2 SBD , but I’d venture to guess this is an “On Stage” microphone recording with the mics being closer to Trey and Page on the stage. Noticeable splice in YaMar. Unfortunately the majority of the song is cut. Beautiful recording overall though! It’s unclear if there was any other songs played after McGrupp? I would imagine theres more to Set 2. Another well played show for the western Mass fans. Donna Lee made an appearance for the first time since it’s debut at Goddard on 10/29/88. Highlights: YEM, Alumni, A-Train, McGrupp
, attached to 2022-04-22

Review by itsice88

itsice88 I don't write show reviews too often, but this night struck me so much in its singularity that I felt I needed to put some thoughts down. Much of this show's legend going forward will revolve around the stunning visual display in set 3...and rightfully so. It was probably the best "gag" the band has performed in several years, and arguably one of the best ever. However, I think what makes this show so great is its musical depth. Phish has often used 3 set shows in the 3.0 era to showcase their catalog in a more straightforward fashion, often forgoing deep improvisation. This show is the diametric opposite of that. Phish goes deep in each set from this night...and often. Set 1 starts with a super relaxed, super confident 17 minute Everything's Right into a 9 minute Tube. Other highlights from this set include the deep take on Axilla II into a particularly spirited Bathtub Gin. All in all, an excellent opening frame. Set 2 here...talk about something that looks one way on paper, but in reality is totally different in reality. This set is masterful (outside of Fuego's rickety composed section). This thing is a masterclass in flow. The band is completely in the zone and nothing is stopping the improvisational ideas from flowing. SYSF>Light>Fuego is one of the best hour-ish segments of music the band has played since returning last year. Ideas upon ideas with Fuego producing some of the most unique improvisational music I've heard in quite some time. Throw in a perfect WTU placement, and a spirited take on Numberline, and this thing gets wrapped up with a bow. I love how this set weeds out the casuals and the setlist-focused people. This is likely the best set of the run and it has the "worst" setlist. Classic Phish with a capital P. People have written quite a bit about the stunning visuals of set 3. I'll only say that I was in section 111 right behind the stage...and it was basically the perfect spot to take in the breathtaking visuals. It was incredible...but as always, I'm focused on the music. And the music...was great. Free starts the set with a very solid straightforward take on the song. A Wave of Hope is a pretty inspired new mid-tempo rocker that I actually dig quite a bit. This Waves/Sand/Split Open and Melt segment though...this is what pushes this show firmly in the "legendary" camp for me. All three of these songs are performed with exuberance and boundless creativity, marrying the stunning visuals with legitimately great music. Again, this show manages to avoid the trappings of a normal "gag" set where the band forgoes musical depth for the spectacle. This set and this segment in particular marries the two in way that Phish rarely if ever, has accomplished...at least not in many years. The spectacle continues into the encore with a strong version of It's Ice, its first appearance in the encore slot...and this marathon night is finished. I'm left with gratitude from this show, and it's provided a packed treasure trove of musical highlights to listen to for years to come. This for me is one of the best shows the band has played in the 3.0 era. I'm endlessly surprised and delighted that the band can still top themselves in their 39th year of existence. Long live Phish.
, attached to 1993-08-16

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Yet another excellent show from August '93. Both sets from this show feature some really iconic jamming, producing a few truly historic versions of some of Phish's best tunes. A 13-minute Possum in the second song slot demonstrates just how comfortable the band has become with the newly regular Type II jamming, weaving in and out of the true Possum jam with impressive agility thanks to the band's ability to feed off the ideas of one another. After a stock-standard Horn, we get one of the best Reba's I've ever heard. For all the more prototypical Reba jams I've heard (and trust me, I love every single one), it's really refreshing to hear one of the earlier iterations that really strays from the steady Lydian groove with such tactful evolution. Trey smoothly leads the band through a few different passages to explore various energies and moods before bringing us right back to Reba for a blazing finish. Foam and SOaM continue the Set 1 trend: every other tune slaps. The transition to the silent jam on Foam is fantastic and gives Fishman a peaceful moment to just groove out. And PLEASE go listen to the last couple minutes of SOaM: every single member of the band is on fucking fire here, following Trey's lead through some terrifying descending riffs that start higher and higher up the fretboard each time. Fishman is a beast here. With a Squirming Coil that at times achieves both serene delicacy and determined confidence, ending on some more emotionally complex chords, we conclude first set for the ages. In Set 2, we start to see some telltale signs of where the band is in its development. A sweet Mike's Groove with Faht meat kicks things off, and both ends get their share of Type II action. Mike's jam is heavily reliant on the syncopated riffs, harmonic dissonance, and fragmented groove jamming that is so typical of this earlier era, done extremely well but lacking in some of the more heavily developed ideas that would become commonplace in years to come. Weekapaug moves through several distinct sections, including trading fours with Fishman's drum solos, a Gypsy Woman jam, a somewhat sloppy I Wish groove, and a subdued moment that almost resembles the intro to Pebbles and Marbles. All around awesome Mike's Groove. From here, we get some solid but typical performances to fill out the rest of Set 2. As much as I love the tunes they choose, their placement in the set is indicative of the band's still-developing approach to setlist construction. A few Rift tunes, Poor Heart, Big Ball Jam, and 'A' Train kill some of the grand, experimental momentum the band had developed throughout the first set and the Mike's Groove. GTBT picks the energy back up a bit to close, but I'm left wanting a little more jamming. Still a ripper of a show, though.
, attached to 2022-04-21

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Taking a big step up from N1 of the April MSG run, the band had clearly shaken off a good amount of rust for the next few nights. I'm still not sure which night was my personal favorite among 4/21-4/23, but just reading the setlist for N2, it's clear Phish was out to please. Set 1 covers a lot of ground: some well-played but standard fan favorites in Suzy, 46 Days, and Plasma; a couple meaty jams out of Wolfman's and Ghost; and a few rarities I had all but given up on seeing from TMWSIY, Avenu Malkenu, and Esther. Aside from a couple forgeiveable slip ups in Esther, I thought this entire set sounded fantastic. Gold medal goes to the last few minutes of Ghost where Mike sets up a sweet and sultry mood and Trey slowly takes it to the god damn moon. Set 2 follows suit with another excellent batch of tunes. Starting off with a jammed out CDT, the band spends most of the tune in an I Know You Rider-esque groove to let Trey fly around the fretboard, guiding the ebb and flow of energy. Without the world's smoothest transition, Trey signals to -> into Tweezer, where we get some more teases of Your Pet Cat, some really awesome call & response (hell yeah Mike), and then transition to an uplifting C major jam that maintains its delicacy even at its peak. Also Sprach gave the audience some nice Martian Monster / Woo! time and scratched my itch to see another 2001 at an indoor venue (something about those lights just hit so much harder at MSG than Dick's). Trey absolutely crushed the Maze peak before starting off About to Run (the first song I wasn't super excited for). Things picked back up with another unexpected tune in Mango Song, a false ending Harry Hood that dips its toes in a bunch of different modes of D before the final resolution, and a killer Character Zero->Tweezer->Character Zero finale that sent the audience reeling. After these two killer sets, I was a bit bummed to end with a less-than-inspired Life Beyond the Dream (one of the weaker versions, imo), but I'll always take a Tweeprise :) Overall, I definitely thought the band turned it the fuck on for N2, delivering one of the more entertaining and consistent shows I've personally attended. Checked off a few bucket list songs and offered plenty of dancing. Upon relistening, I think Ghost stands out as an easy highlight from the evening; go check it out.
, attached to 1993-07-24

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Been listening to a ton of shows from August '93 over the past few days, digging through the month that most Phans agree marked the regularity of Type II jamming and, in a way, the birth of the Phish we know now. Out of curiosity, I decided to step back just a week to this 7/24 show to get a comparison point as I was wondering just how stark the August line was. Reading through some of the other reviews on the site though, I learned that this show was unique for the time: Great Woods '93 was the band's biggest show yet, selling out to a "hometown" New England audience roughly 12K strong. With this context in mind, I think it might be best not to draw too close a comparison between 7/24 and the back half of the summer tour but rather to view this as the gateway show that proved the bands' chops had a community to back it up. Performing a rock solid (even if straightforward) show in a setting like this, Phish earned the confidence that would drive deeper exploration and invention in the coming weeks and follow them into '94 (and beyond). Would I revisit? Probably not frequently, but I'm glad I checked it out to help fill in my picture of summer '93. Most of the tunes in Set 1 are pretty cookie-cutter, but all are super strong and devoid of flubs. Mike and Fishman are great during Trey's solo on Llama (some similarities between this one and 8/7/93). Stash rips hard and dark as the band dives into the jam section with a descending motif, later pulling us out with an ascending ladder and booming peak. The Squirming Coil outro closes Set 2 in grand fashion: the band sticks around for a bit longer than usual, for a moment seeming like they'll enter full band jam territory (a la 5/8/93), but then opts to let Page rock out solo--a decision not regretted. In Set 2, we see a little more bravery as the band digs into a Mike's Groove and takes the unbeaten path more than the rest of the show. Mike's Song jam has some nice floaty jamming that resembles a calmer Simple mixed with a 12-bar blues harmonic structure. The a cappella Yerushalayim Shel Zahav grants a beautifully eerie intermission before Fishman picks things back up into Weekapaug and the band pulls off some nice noodly improvisation, a swing blues break, and closes things out in standard fashion. The rest of the set--like the first--contains some pretty standard versions of a bunch of fan favorites. Standouts in my opinion are a very strong SOaM and Maze.
, attached to 1993-08-07

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Another excellent gem from summer '93, this show features two sets fairly dense with songs, musicianship, and improvisation--though the last of which is not taken to the same extreme as it is by some of the other landmark shows that take place later in the month. Set 1 gives us plenty to chew on. Llama opens with a particular ferocity and displays some some sweet comping from the backing band during Trey's solo. The Stash jam explores a few different modal and dissonant spaces, all the while Trey soaring as Mike, Page, and Fishman maintain course and facilitate a subtle ascent in intensity. The transition into Makisupa is as unexpected as it is flawless and marks one of my favorite moments of the first set (the whole Makisupa intro and jam are excellent, as well). Reba and Maze pair quite nicely with the latter neatly fitting in the former's reprisal whistling. The Colonel Forbin's and Mockingbird performance is one of the tunes' more venerable due in part both to Trey's enthralling storytelling and the especially regal outro the band pulls off with Mike's solo. Cavern closes Set 1 with the gusto early Cavern usually displays (a note: I love when Trey finishes the verses' stanzas by moaning along with his guitar, as he does in this version and some others I've heard). Anytime I see a ~4-minute Also Sprach open Set 2, I gear up for some good shit to follow. The extended ambient intro on this performance is utterly brooding and serves well to foreshadow a crazy Mike's -> Kung -> Mike's. The Mike's jam is pretty representative of summer 83's inventive nature. Some moments that sound like confusion between the band on whether to stick in F or resolve to F# end up serving as fodder to develop dissonance, but eventually the groove cools off to a slower waltz. An extremely tense Kung leads us right back to the close of Mike's song, the anticipated resolution of which pays off incredibly well. Also noteworthy from this set are MFMF and McGrupp. While both tunes are typically performed in a pretty straightforward manner, MFMF gets a delicate and plinky Pink Panther-esque outro jam, and McGrupp boasts uniquely swanky solo section between Page and Mike (with Fishman on some tasty percussion) plus a subtle transition into Purple Rain. Closing the second set, Antelope serves as the final high point for the show, displaying blazing hot chops, empathetic jamming, and an improvisational nature exemplary of the period.
, attached to 1993-08-14

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ The past few days I've been going on a self-led tour of August '93, and I was very happy to have some additional context behind my re-listen of the Tinsley Park show. The first set of this show has some pretty stellar moments among a ripper Divided Sky that foreshadows its '94 glory, a dark and dreary Page-centric It's Ice breakdown, and a SOaM that has all four band members exploring melodic and rhythmic space. Dotted between these are some rock solid performances of a few of my other favorite Phish tunes. Set 2 better captures the ethos of the Type II Phish that was really beginning to bloom at this point. Starting off with a launchpad Also Sprach, the "Antelope-fest" jam that makes up the meat of the set is a must-listen for any Phan looking to study the band's early interplay and exploration. It isn't even four minutes in when the band enters Type II territory and sets off an evolving behemoth of a musical journey. There are a number of excellent sections throughout the entire performance, all laden with creativity from each member of the band, and each transition exemplifies impressive agility and syncopation. As others have pointed out, this could be considered the spiritual predecessor to the 5/7/94 Bomb Factory Tweezer-fest jam due to the gnarly segues, the presence of Sparks and Walk Away, and the vast sonic ground covered from end to end. Without trying to sound like I'm forming an indictment of this performance (I most certainly am not), I'll call out that this jam sequence seemed to have a bit of a shorter attention span that that of Bomb Factory, flipping between segments a little more quickly and flippantly. The efficiency of the Antelope jam makes me forget that there's still plenty left to Set 2. In addition to a few sweet standard selections and a goofy Purple Rain, YEM stands out as another set highlight. Still representative of the August '93 setting, we get plenty of teases of other tunes and readily re-imagine the baseline YEM groove following Page's solo. Overall, a super fun show that--along with a number of others--captures the band entering its next major phase of development. P.S. If you're listening on Live Phish Vol. 7, it is definitely worth checking out the filler material. The Great Gig Mike's Groove from 8/11/93 offers further examples of the band's riffing off one another as a simple pattern established by Mike early in the jam follows the band for several minutes and Trey's rhythms inspire Fishman to pivot the groove in a few different directions before -> Great Gig. The supplemental Stash from 8/15/93 is a favorite of mine from this era. In contrast to some of the more capricious jams from summer of '93, this one builds on itself and evolves with extreme patience that challenges one to delineate distinct sections. Around 11:00, the band aligns on a fantastically optimistic mixolydian groove full of rhythmic and melodic elements reminiscent of Mango Song. The less-organized blend back into Stash plays extremely well.
, attached to 2022-04-22

Review by rjmasterson

rjmasterson What a show. The Everything's Right->Tube was strong and kicked off what promised to be a splendid, if delayed, New Year's celebration. 555 made a nice appearance, giving way to a roaring "Back On The Train" that suitably kept things moving. Army Of One set up an Axilla (Pt. II) that tore us open, and then we were really going. A nice if somewhat unremarkable Gin preceded a mighty S.A.N.T.O.S. - apt, given we always would remember where we were, even if none of us knew what was in store. One tidbit I've read in a few places that I nevertheless feel compelled to note here, mostly for my own sanity and recollection: the 555 gave way to five more songs in the first set, then five in the second, and finally five in the third, making for the 555 show. These guys! The second set was forceful; personal highlights there were the Fuego and probably the strongest BDTNL I've ever experienced live, shouting out to Bella's birthday. All the while, though, our minds were on the foretold set III, and everything until that would be an appetizer. In between 2 and 3, we saw the stage cleared, only what appeared to be a giant white sheet left in its wake. We spent setbreak speculating and considering all the possible contexts: no Halloween this year, so maybe a full album cover? The Earth Day shirts and branding was omnipresent, but could it be a misdirection? Lights go down, and set III starts with a monstrous Free in which it immediately became apparent that the real star of the show would be CK5: Kuroda was absolutely on fire (and ice, and everything in between), setting the stage literally and psychologically with the lighting design. My head was on a swivel. I couldn't stop gawking at everything visually happening. A Wave of Hope gave us some insight into the Earth Day theme, and then, sure enough...that Waves. First, we in the audience simply became the ocean, various shades of blue and green descending upon us. The flying dolphins were one thing, a cool gimmick, and then no less than the Museum of Natural History whale emerged from under where we were standing, capturing everyone's (including the band's, by the looks of the video) attention. The bobbing ambient soundscape blended perfectly with the visuals, and the drone sea-dwelling mammals dipped and dove as if actually in water, nearly interacting with retired Knicks and Rangers jersey banners in the rafters. It was an absolutely unbelievable sight. The two-hitter of Sand and Split Open and Melt, both of which had featured at the Gorge last summer, opened my cranium and deposited severe hits of dopamine. The encore It's Ice was, naturally, icing on the cake. Overall, an incredible show, if a little heavier on gimmickry and effects than notable for the musical prowess - which isn't to say that the music was bad, either. Quite the contrary, they complemented each other perfectly throughout the show and especially in the third. It was just that the visuals were so astounding, everything else is ever so slightly on the back burner in hindsight. I'll be re-listening to this one for a long time to come, I imagine.
, attached to 2000-07-04

Review by Shadowfox0

Shadowfox0 When the ENTIRE second set list is jam worthy you know you have something special on your hands We all know that Trey is originally from NJ on his Mom's side and I may despise Jersey there is nothing that looks like a Garden or a State especially not in Trenton or Camden but nostalgia rules and makes Trey remember old photos of days gone by so for that reason I will give this venue top marks their top 2 shows one of them happened here in 1999 Back in the Chicken Shack for sure I only got to see some of the worst shows and the WORST were still amazing Phish shows 7-30-2003 Best YEM I have attended to date best MFMF opener ever and best Twist Walls of the Cave even Bug was good and I hate Bug(s) the song and the scritcher creature and the best ever opener besides maybe Fluffhead or Lizards is Wilson and I got a Wilson my first show opener in Cinci 2-21-2003 and another on what i assumed and everyone did would be their last 2 set show EVER 8-12-2004 Great opener for sure for all your CHOMPERS out there that love to sing or clap along to songs like Stash or HOOD vocals opener This show is not quite as good as its predecessor in 1999 the best show ever to many Phish fans and i get why they think so This is not 2-28-2003 or Night 2 Magnaball level greatness but it is damn close When an entire 2nd set is a Jam that is cool as fuck when has that EVER happened except in this show? I would love to hear a reputtal show even if it is the 1st set all Jams that would be even more of a miracle so i dont think that ever happened This show even at 4.5 is underrated to me Unless you can come up w another show that the entire 2nd set was a Jam Not including Lawn Boy it was not the 30 minute 2017 one of course so it never jammed until that night in MSG and Zepplin is a rocker but just a guitar solo rocker like Sample in a Jar or Fire or Quinn the Eskimo Creedence nothing special in terms of jamming Even the best 1995 Johnny b Goode is still just a guitar solo at the end of the day They have yet to truly jam that song unless they went back w Marty McFly and changed Phish history in the past if so cool but until then Lawn Boy and Sample are the only 2 non jam songs jammed on 7-24-2017 because it was Donut Raspberry filled JAM night UNDERRATED SHOW even at 4.5 just saying
, attached to 1986-10-15

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Though "Phish" had been around for nearly three years at this point, the band that plays this show is still super early in its formative stages. The step up to Hunt's from some of Burlington's (and UVM's/Goddard's) smaller venues represents a milestone as the band solidified itself as a local favorite, an upgrade from the group of buddies that would entertain their friends and classmates more casually. Though the tightknit, in-group community aura remains present for a few years, it's at this point in the band's career where the audiences began to contain some "Phish fans" in addition to peers. Fall of '86 seems to be the point where the absence of Jeff and presence of Page feels familiar and comfortable, exemplified by a transformed (but still not finalized) McGrupp and moments like the Magic quote at the end of Shaggy Dog. The goofy Roll Like a Cantaloupe and debut of Fluffhead pieces Clod and Lushington also mark the early chapters of some of Phish's defining tunes. This said, there are still plenty of signs of a group still searching for its identity: improvisations are kept on a tight leash and are relatively devoid of intra-band building. Another distinction that I found especially prominent can be found in Trey's guitarwork: both his tone and playstyle are heavily influenced by Jerry Garcia (they seriously sound like the Dead at certain points). It's cool to listen to the transformation that took place between this period and the late '87 shows that see Phish beginning to make some decisions that would ultimately lead to the 90s-era band we all know and love.
, attached to 1993-08-13

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ As others have pointed out, Murat '93 comes at a time in the band's career when their free-flowing, reactionary improvisational prowess really began to come into its own. August '93 is full of blank canvas jamming that really breaks the mold of the songs that serve as the point of origin, and this show is no exception (particularly Set II). David Bowie, Bathtub Gin, and Mike's Song all serve as excellent representation of the maturing exploratory interplay the band was tackling at the time and each becoming fan favorites. David Bowie's extended intro section demonstrates plenty of rhythmic and harmonic quirks that increase tension with steady patience, making the eventual drop-in all the more satisfying. The jam in this section evolves quite a bit, forgoing the path to a crazy anarchy peak and instead opting to rely on controlled musical exploration, working in some fantastic allusions to Mango Song and Magilla. The final peaks absolutely soar (as they always do on Bowie). Bathtub Gin 8/13/93 is rightfully hailed as a song-defining performance. As the jam charts point out, earlier iterations of this tune rarely left the typical Gin mold. In August 93, though, we see a 16-minute version laden with vocal ad libs and teases abound that reaches a flash point of explosive energy at higher tempo and then slowly descends to an unrecognizable Type II groove and morphs into Ya Mar. Though my unpopular opinion is that Murat Gin is not even close to the best Gin, I will readily concede that it is an important landmark in the band's and song's lifetime for its demonstrative musical creativity. Like Gin, Mike's Song goes places nobody really expected it to. Once the jam drops into F, a number of sonic grounds are covered from a calm, floating bass solo, to a slow and brooding doomsday-like syncopation that gives way to a Ted Nugent nod. Some of the most incredible parts of this jam though are the seamless transition back to F# Mike's jam and the subsequent melt into a phenomenal Lifeboy. Outside of these big hitters, this show brings with it a few select versions of other tunes, namely an eerie Lengthwise->Llama, a Foam with 94/95-esque dynamic flexibility, a textbook version of Fluffhead with an especially delicate ending, a powerful Lifeboy, and a closing, celebratory Suzy. There's more to love each time I revisit.
, attached to 1987-08-29

Review by MrPalmers1000DollarQ

MrPalmers1000DollarQ Listened to this show at the suggestion of the [i]Undermine [/i] podcast. After listening to some of the even earlier Phish (first show in '83, 10/15/86, 10/31/86), I can definitely see how this show serves as an exemplary sample of the invention Phish was going through in '87. Relics of the pre-Junta band--such as the disassembled pieces of Fluff's Travels, the original intro to AC/DC Bag, and since-abandoned covers like Swing Low Sweet Chariot--mix well with the elements that would become commonplace and definitive for Phish through the late 80s and beyond--among them a Mike's->Hydrogen, sung lyrics to McGrupp, and most importantly improvisational jams that are simultaneously exploratory and directed. With Page fitting more comfortably into the band and Trey employing a playstyle more distinct from that of his predecessors (10/15/86 sounds especially Garcia-inspired), these August '87 shows really pinpoint a formative moment in the band's career and identity. The .net jam charts pick out most of the same highlights that I might: berserk Sneakin' Sally VJ, blissfully serene Makisupa solo, epically grand Curtain With jam, and must-hear David Bowie->JJLC foreshadows the mega-jam vehicle role the former tune would take on throughout 1.0 and beyond. I also found it interesting to hear some of the earlier versions of tunes like Suzy Greenberg, BBFCFM (which I admittedly liked considerably better than later, crazier performances), and Divided Sky. Definitely recommend taking a listen to this show if you're interested in some of the band's roots.
, attached to 1989-05-01

Review by thelot

thelot First off, I find it interesting that this show has been rated by 48 different fans when the average show around this time is typically rated by 14 individuals? The source for this is a pretty flat SBD with multiple cassette generations. Luckily the pitch is perfect and the music comes through if you don’t mind cassette hiss. It’s the type of recording that’ll take you back to the good ol’ tape trading days. . Unfortunately, we don’t have the 2nd set to review here as it looks like a good one. Set 1 is pretty solid. A few notes. The OG Alumni seems to be back. This version has a pretty harsh cut. Beautiful version of A-Train. Fish’s jazzy drum solo has been omitted from Split Open. I was curious to see if Fish would take back to back drum solos in A-Train and Split Open. Decent first set overall. Hopefully a master copy of set one and two show up some day.
, attached to 1989-04-30

Review by thelot

thelot Not the best audience recording here. I think this is due more to room acoustics than the microphones used. There seems to only be a handful of cassette generations in the source lineage. The source on ReListen cuts out Ben Hunters introduction. YEM is also cut very early in the song. It’s interesting to hear Trey try to explain Gamehendge to the drunk and rowdy crowd. You would think he would’ve waited for a more attentive audience. Overall a decent set of music. Highlights: Divided Sky, Wilson, Antelope and Possum
, attached to 2018-10-19

Review by tiggerphish

tiggerphish I love this venue. That said, I had never chosen to sit behind the stage in my 6 previous ventures inside. This was my vantage point and, as the 55 mgs of 4-AcO-DMT was kicking in and the opening notes of Strawberry Letter 23 wrapped around Mothership and slammed the right side of my head, I knew this last second choice was the right one for this evening. That's all I got from a revue standpoint. I do know this was yet another night to remember in Hampton, VA. In my most favorite venue. Thanks.
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